Soil: Good for Your Garden and Good for Your Health

What link do soil and depression have? Read on for more information!


As reported by Uplift, scientists have linked soil to helping people affected by depression. Even those not affected by depression can reap the benefits because, as stated by the article written on July 17, soil boosts levels of dopamine and serotonin-two neurotransmitters which direct our moods, emotions, and other regular body functions. The effects of soil to enhance mood, as the article says, was discovered accidentally by an oncologist treating lung cancer patients. 

Despite the article being recent, it's no surprise to gardeners that gardening is good for your mood! Being outside, increased exercise, the meditative repetition of daily garden chores are all among reasons that gardening is a great stress reliever. Now, the conversation about the microorganisms in our soil which add additional benefits to our general well-being, is just another fantastic reason to add to the lengthy list. All of this is a great finding in the Public Health world as well. Overall well-being and mental health are both areas of treatment within Public Health. At Grays Harbor Public Health, we love discovering bridges like soil which connect different areas of the field.

Whether you're looking for soil benefits, fresh produce, to get involved in your community, or to talk about gardening stop by the Cultivating Roots Garden this summer and see what's growing! Did you read the article? Let us know what you think in the comments below.

 A volunteer holds a turnip from the garden, maybe his excitement came from microorganisms in the soil!

A volunteer holds a turnip from the garden, maybe his excitement came from microorganisms in the soil!