How Fresh is Your Food?

According to the NRDC, a typical meal eaten in the U.S contains ingredients from at least 5 different countries.

Coming from 5 countries means our food travels a long way to our homes. The number of miles traveled by our food not only (negatively) increases the environmental impact of our food, but also increases the length of time our fresh produce sits between harvest to digestion. The more time in transit, the less nutrients we as consumers receive from our food. Our foods are proven be at their peak nutrition immediately after harvest. And not only has our produce lost healthy benefits, but if you've ever eaten a fruit or vegetable picked straight from the plant then you know the store-bought stuff isn't nearly as flavorful either.

So, how fresh is your food? If you are buying it from the grocer, chances are probably not too fresh. What can you do to get fresher food? Grow it yourself!

Here are some benefits of growing your groceries yourself:

  • Decrease your impact on the environment
  • Increase the taste and flavor of your food
  • Increase the health benefits of your food
  • Save money
  • Decrease stress
  • Increase physical activity
  • Increase time spent outside

Really there are so many reasons to start a garden of your own! You can visit our garden resource page, the WSU garden website, or check out a book from Timberland Library for some beginner tips.

 A garden volunteer holds fresh radishes. Harvest time has begun and delicious, nutritious veggies are being harvested at the Cultivating Roots Garden!

A garden volunteer holds fresh radishes. Harvest time has begun and delicious, nutritious veggies are being harvested at the Cultivating Roots Garden!